RECIPES


Tempeh
Tempeh ("tem-pea" or "tem-pay") is like tofu, but fermented and pressed to be thick and savory. An easy way to prepare tempeh is to fry or grill with blended seasonings meant for grilling. Check your ingredients, of course, but surprisingly many are vegan.

 
Tofu

Tofu is a solid food made from pressed soybean curd. It's one of the most unusual vegan staples in that it can be used to make a breakfast dish like scrambled tofu, a dinner dish like pan-fried tofu. Tofu gets a bad wrap in popular culture as a tasteless food, but tofu isn't meant to be a flavor agent. It works best at soaking up flavors and giving them a texture and consistency.

Seitan


Seitan is a chewy and naturally brown substance made from wheat gluten, an isolated protein found in wheat. Seitan is usually cut into strips and baked or fried to provide some protein and chewiness to a dish. Like tempeh, seitan is very easy to prepare and needs little to no seasoning. Try seitan broccolini with clementine teriyaki.


Nutritional Yeast

Nutritional yeast is very different from the yeast used in bread. Nutritional yeast, which comes powdered or in flakes, is most often used to provide a cheesy consistency. Unlike cheese, nutritional yeast also lasts far longer and has no cholesterol. Sprinkle in soup, on popcorn, or add water to make cheesy sauces.


Red Star Nutritional Yeast

Ingredients: The number of non-vegan ingredients found in food and products is too numerous to mention here, but we've included some of the most common below.


Common Non-vegan Ingredients

​·Casein 
Casein is a protein from milk. Surprisingly, this is often found in soy cheeses!


·Carmine/Carminic Acid

Also known as Crimson Lake, Cochineal, Natural Red 4, C.I. 75470, or E120, carmine is made from crushed cochineal insects with bright red shells. Often used as a red food coloring.

·Beeswax 

Beeswax, as the name implies comes from honeybees. Why isn't honey/beeswax vegan?

·Gelatin 
Gelatin is a substance produced from the collagen found in animal bones and
hoofs. This is often used for marshmallows, Jello®, and as a preservative.

·Some Alcoholic Beverages 
Some alcohols use isinglass, egg albumen, or bone char to filter wines, beers,
and liquors. To
find out if your alcohol is vegan, look up the company on Barnivore.com.You can also opt for many German beers and unfiltered wines.

·Lactose 
Lactose is a protein from milk. However, lactic acid is almost always vegan.

·Lanolin 
Lanolin, also known as wool fat, comes from the wool of sheep.

·Vitamin D3 
Often found in fortified orange juice, vitamin D3 comes from Lanolin, a sheep product. D2, however, is vegan.

·Whey 
Whey is a milk protein often used as a protein boost in some commercial foods.

 

Replacements

Here are some quick tips for using vegan ingredients to replace the animal products in your favorite recipes.


Eggs

·Apple Sauce 
Applesauce will give off a gas while being cooked, making your baked goods fluffy. It's also doesn't require adding as much liquid as powdered replacers. 

1/4 cup applesauce = 1 egg

·Ground Flax Seed 
When ground to a powder and liquified with water, ground flax seed creates a gooey texture great for binding. It's also full of protein and omega-3s. 1 tbsp ground flax + 3 tbsp water = 1 egg.

·Banana 
Like applesauce, bananas are naturally sweet. They also have strong binding properties when used baked goods. 1/2 banana = 1 egg

·Baking soda/powder 
When you really need your dish fluffy without extra flavor, simple baking soda or baking powder does wonders. 1 tsp baking powder + 1 1/2 tbs water + 1 1/2 tbs oilor 1 tbs vinegar + 1 tsp baking soda = 1 egg.


Milk

·Soy/Oat/Hemp/Almond/etc. milk. By now, you've probably heard of the increasingly popular nut- and bean-derived milk products making their way into grocery stores. While soymilk is probably the most prevalent, some prefer rice milk for its naturally light and sweet flavor and almond milk for a boost of Vitamin E, monounsaturated fats, dietary fiber, and B vitamins.

·Vegetable Oil 
The only difference between a fat and an oil is that a fat is a solid at room temperature. Often when milk is used in foods like mashed potatoes, it's the
fat that makes it creamy. Substituting this for vegetable or olive oil is equally as satisfying and much healthier.

 


Food Blogs

·Happy Healthy Life

·Vegan Yum Yum

·The Vegan Stoner

·Vegan Dad

·Manifest Vegan

·Vegan Feast Kitchen

·Olives for Dinner

·Big Raw

·Veganacious

·Vegan Eats And Treats

·Happy Herbivore

·So What Do Vegans Eat?

·Fat-Free Vegan Kitchen

·Meet The Shannons

·Awesome Vegan Blog

·Oh She Glows

·Vegan Crunk

·The Snarky Chickpea

·Seitan Is My Motor

·Ginger Is The New Pink

·I Eat Trees

 

 Cookbooks

The New American Vegan by Vincent J. Guihan

 Weaving together personal stories with 120 appetizing recipes, this friendly cookbook delivers authentically American and vegan cuisine that has to be tasted to be believed. Midwestern-inspired recipes range from very basic to the modestly complicated, but always with an eye on creating something beautiful and delicious in its simplicity. Clear text provides step-by-step instructions and helps new cooks find their feet in a vegan kitchen, with a whole chapter devoted to terms, tools, and techniques. With an eye towards improvisation, the cookbook provides a detailed basic recipe that is good as-is, while providing additional notes that explain how to take each recipe further—to increase flavor, to add drama to the presentation, or just to add extra flourish."

· Vegan Yum Yum

· The 30 Minute Vegan

· Color Me Vegan

· The Quick Fix

· 1000 Vegan Recipes

· The Vegan Diner

 

 

"Vegan food has come a long way in the past decade. The once ubiquitous dry, packaged veggie burger is no longer the poster child for
an animal-free diet. 
It has evolved into a creative, sophisticated cuisine touted by the likes of Food & Wine magazine. Long at the fore of vegan blogging and cooking, Dreena Burton has been known for making healthy taste delicious. Let Them Eat Vegan! distills more than fifteen years of recipe development that emphasize unrefined, less-processed ingredients--no white flour or white sugar, but instead whole-grain flours, natural sweeteners, raw foods, and plenty of beans ’n greens. There’s no relying on meat analogues here, either--just hearty, healthy food that looks and tastes great. As the mother of three young girls, Burton always keeps their nutrition--and taste buds--in mind. From the simplest comfort foods like Warm 'Vegveeta' Cheese Sauce to the more sophisticated Anise-and Coriander-Infused Orange Lentil Soup, these recipes will delight and inspire even the pickiest eaters and provide lifelong vegans with the innovative, wholesome recipes they’ve always wanted."


 

The 30-Minute Vegan by Mark Reinfeld and Jennifer Murray

 

"Busy vegans, rejoice! award-winning husband and wife chefs/authors Reinfeld and Murray present 150 delicious, easy-to prepare recipes for everyday vegan cooking—all dishes that can be prepared in a half-hour. Sections include The Lighter Side of Life: Smoothies & Satiating Beverages; Snacks, Pick Me Ups & Kids’ Favorites; Lunches: Wraps, Rolls, Bowls, and More; Extraordinary Salads; Sumptuous Soups; Small Plates: Appetizers, Side Dishes, Light Dinners; Wholesome Suppers; Guilt-Free Comfort Food: Healthy Translations of Old Stand-bys; and Divine Desserts. The 30-Minute Vegan also provides at-a-glance cooking charts, kids’ favorite dishes, and exciting menu suggestions for every occasion—making this an essential cookbook for busy vegans who want to enjoy delicious, healthful, whole-foods vegan fare every day."



The Joy of Vegan Baking by Colleen Patrick-Goudreau

 

"A seasoned cooking instructor and self-described "joyful vegan," author Colleen Patrick-Goudreau puts to rest the myth that vegan baking is an inferior alternative to non-vegan baking, putting it in its rightful place as a legitimate contender in the baking arena. More than just a collection of recipes, this informative cookbook is a valuable resource for any baker -- novice or seasoned. Learn just how easy it is to enjoy your favorite homespun goodies without compromising your health or values."


Vegan Cupcakes Take Over the World by Isa Chandra Moskowitz and Terry Hope Romero

 

The hosts of the vegan cooking show The Post Punk Kitchen are back with a vengeance — and this time, dessert. A companion volume to Vegan with a Vengeance, Vegan Cupcakes Take Over the World is a sweet and sassy guide to baking everyone's favorite treat without using any animal products. This unique cookbook contains over 50 recipes for cupcakes and frostings — some innovative, some classics — with beautiful full color photographs. Isa and Terry offer delicious, cheap, dairy-free, egg-free and vegan-friendly recipes like Classic Vanilla Cupcakes (with chocolate frosting), Crimson Velveteen Cupcakes (red velvet with creamy white frosting), Linzer Torte Cupcakes (hazelnut with raspberry and chocolate ganache), Chai Latte Cupcakes (with powdered sugar) and Banana Split Cupcakes (banana-chocolate chip-pineapple with fluffy frosting). Included also are gluten-free recipes, decorating tips, baking guidelines, vegan shopping advice, and Isa's true cupcake anecdotes from the trenches. When Vegan Cupcakes Take Over the World, no dessert lover can resist.